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Focus

 

chartRecently our daughter visited the eye doctor, we thought she had an infection but it was simply an irritation, no big deal. I don’t normally go into the exam room with our girl anymore because she is old enough to communicate her needs at this point, but I was invited this time. Georgia has exceptionally poor eyesight, not able to recognize any one or any thing without her contacts or glasses. I learned years ago to say very little to her when waking her in the morning, because it’s so disorienting to her to not be able to see, and yet be expected to communicate. First thing in the morning.

So, the eye doctor had Georgia remove her glasses so he could examine her, but began asking her questions with his back turned to her. I watched as my daughter went from a vibrant, focused young woman to a limp, empty little girl in that chair. She simply looked down and off to the side, away from anything and flatly answered questions. The doctor examined her and eventually had her put her glasses back on. Instantly, she was smiling and making eye contact; it was like the difference between being asleep and awake. I asked her about the encounter as we were leaving and she said it’s not worth it to try so hard to focus on anything when she knows she cannot see it, so she just gives up.

Instantly I understood how she felt. Oh God, forgive me for so often taking my focus off of You, for removing my glasses and losing sight of what’s truly important, for being so quick to simply give up.

I am thankful for the fact that my daughter lives in a time when her weakness can be made strong, someone with her vision a few generations ago would be regarded as useless. I’m also thankful for the reminder that my weaknesses can be made strong if I just keep my focus on God.

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2 responses »

  1. I have 20/800 vision. I don’t disconnect quite like Georgia (sweet name), but I can feel left out. It used to be that way when I went swimming with other kids and they would play water games. Unless I wore my glasses in the pool, which my mother discouraged, I never got to join in. When I got older, contacts made a big difference in my life. I used to say I wear my glasses until I can find my contacts. I remember the first time I wore my contacts in the rain and could still see and the first time I came in from the cold and didn’t have lenses fog over. I felt normal.

    Reply

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